LJR Enterprises

Our homestead, Our links

Month: May, 2010

‘cube grenades’: using my cartoons to help your business kick ass | gapingvoid

by Scott Smith

I think surroun­ding our­sel­ves with icons, art, books and such to remind our­sel­ves of who we are, where we have been and where we hope to go is essen­tial to kee­ping our hearts alive. It is too easy to lose our way. My office is full of these things.

Posted via web from S. MacKay Smith’s Notes

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Future of Video Game Design – Jason Rohrer’s Programming Online Games – Esquire

by Scott Smith

Then Rohrer met his wife, Lauren Serafin, in Ithaca. She was just like him, the daughter of wealthy business owners, harboring similar dreams of escape. A heart exploded. They searched a Web site listing the food co-ops across America. They crossed out the co-ops in towns with expensive real estate and landed here, Potsdam, a place where they could focus on the experiences of their lives instead of their materiality, and where Rohrer could finally have his meadow, assuming he could make the people of Potsdam trust that this meadow was a legitimate and good and dutiful and logical thing and not some lazy indulgence, not a deadbeat’s excuse not to mow, not an eyesore, at least not to him, because he cared about it, cared enough to carve it out and defend it, fight for it, believe in its potential, this odd form of expression he had chosen to love — the weed smells and the insect noise, the butterflies, the berries getting ripe and fat and falling and staining the ground purple, the smell of the compost pile spoiling, the apples and peppers and banana peels dissolving to mulch.

Christ, can’t you see this? This lush green atmosphere dying so gorgeously all around him? And Rohrer with a laptop, sitting cross-legged in the dirt, inventing a new way of showing the world what it means to be alive?

Posted via web from S. MacKay Smith’s Notes

Using CSS3 Transitions, Transforms and Animation

by Scott Smith

Using CSS3 Transitions, Transforms and Animation

Posted via web from S. MacKay Smith’s Notes

After keeping us waiting for a century, Mark Twain will finally reveal all – News, Books – The Independent

by Scott Smith

nother potential motivation for leaving the book to be posthumously published concerns Twain’s legacy as a Great American. Michael Shelden, who this year published Man in White, an account of Twain’s final years, says that some of his privately held views could have hurt his public image.

“He had doubts about God, and in the autobiography, he questions the imperial mission of the US in Cuba, Puerto Rico and the Philippines. He’s also critical of [Theodore] Roosevelt, and takes the view that patriotism was the last refuge of the scoundrel. Twain also disliked sending Christian missionaries to Africa. He said they had enough business to be getting on with at home: with lynching going on in the South, he thought they should try to convert the heathens down there.”

Posted via web from S. MacKay Smith’s Notes

Human Body in a Vacuum

by Scott Smith

Various minor problems (sunburn, possibly “the bends”, certainly some [mild, reversible, painless] swelling of skin and underlying tissue) start after ten seconds or so. At some point you lose consciousness from lack of oxygen. Injuries accumulate. After perhaps one or two minutes, you’re dying. The limits are not really known.

Posted via web from S. MacKay Smith’s Notes

Article on Food Deserts

by Robinson

http://www.indyweek.com/indyweek/an-oasis-in-a-food-desert/Content?oid=1434063

You New College Graduate: A Parents’ Guide : The New Yorker

by Scott Smith

Congratulations! It took four years and hundreds of thousands of dollars, but you’re finally the parents of a bona-fide college graduate. After the commencement ceremony is over, your child will be ready to move back into your house for a period of several years. It’s a very exciting time. But it can also be stressful. We hope that this guide will answer all your questions and give you the information you need to care for your precious new college graduate

Posted via web from S. MacKay Smith’s Notes

Anis Shivani: Iowa Writers’ Workshop Graduate Spills It All: Interview with John McNally, Author of “After the Workshop”

by Scott Smith

A few years ago, I was talking to my then-agent about my days of working as a media escort after I had moved back to Iowa City in the mid-1990s, and she said, “You should write that novel.” That’s when the idea of actually writing a full-length novel took root again. Originally, the Writers’ Workshop wasn’t going to be a part of the book, but once I set the novel in Iowa City and made the narrator a writer with a horrible case of writer’s block, I decided to tackle every aspect of the writing and publishing world, including the Workshop. Suddenly, no one and nothing were immune. And that’s when I really started having fun writing it.

Posted via web from S. MacKay Smith’s Notes

Viktor Frankl: Why to believe in others

by Scott Smith

Charlie Munger On Just About Everything – 11/05/2010

by Scott Smith

On absorbing as much knowledge as he has: Learning has never been work for me. It’s play. I was born innately curious. If that doesn’t work for you, figure out your own damn system.

Posted via web from S. MacKay Smith’s Notes